Warrigal Greens and Bacon Frittata

Bacon and Native Spinach Fritata

Bacon and Native Spinach Fritata

Warrigal Greens, or “Native Spinach” (Tetragonia tetragonioides) is native to this area. It remains lush and green through the heat of Summer, long after it’s tender European name-sake has died. It was (and is) an important vegetable for the ancient inhabitants of this land .. and their tender European visitors. It is cooked as you would silverbeet, although the leaves are smaller and fleshier.

Frittata is sometimes called “Spanish Omelette” although I have found regional variations from all over the Mediterranean.  This is my “local” twist on this classic .. and my earnest attempt to stop my Warrigal plants from taking over the neighbourhood (or at least my garden) ..

Comfrey Cream

Comfrey Cream

Comfrey Cream

The roots and leaves of Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) contain allantoin, rosmarinic acid, and tannins. These have been shown to promote new growth of skin cells, reduce inflammation and keep skin healthy. Historically, a cream or paste made from the plant has been used to treat bone fractures, soft tissue damage and bruising. Due to the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids however, no part of the plant should be taken internally. Please see the precautions listed below.

Speculaas

Speculaas

Speculaas

Today is “Harmony Day”.  I am not sure if this is a local phenomenon or whether it has spread to a school near you, so I will explain. It is a day given over to the celebration of cultural diversity. Students are encouraged to wear National dress, bring traditional foods, games, music, or anything else of cultural significance to share.  Like most Australians, the Junior Sorority can trace the threads of their heritage to many lands and cultures .. let’s face it; we’re a mutt culture 🙂  Our contribution was Speculaas, a traditional Dutch biscuit, normally baked for Christmas.

Hot Cross Pudding with the Works

Hot Cross Pudding

Hot Cross Pudding

Time to say farewells.  Time to share one last meal before Chosen-Sister and her amazing family move to foreign climes.  This was the dessert I made to share.  Comfort food to fill the void.  I have a feeling that I am going to shed a tear or three every time I make it again for quite a while.

Irish Marrow Chutney

I have been a little busy for the past couple of weeks, so I’ve not been paying much attention to the courcozelle vines beyond the minefield.  It came as something of a surprise to find that the tiny striped zuccinis I remembered seeing just a week ago are now marrows of significant size.  There is enough for soup, stuffed marrow and chargrilled zuccini pasta sauce for the next month.  Today is St Patrick’s Day however, so I will honour the occasion by making my absolutely favourite chutney.  This is not to downplay my enjoyment of any of the others I make.. however this is the jar I reach for to accompany a dark ale, sharp cheese and crusty bread on any autumn afternoon picnic.  The flavour reminds me of mulled wine .. deep, fruity and richly spiced.  It makes a very tasty addition to stews, meatballs, pies and cheese-and-chutney sandwiches.  Gently warmed it also makes a superb gravy for roast beef or venison.  I may just pour an extra shot or two of whiskey to sip while waiting for it to cook.  Sláinte Gaelach